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Poetry At Work Day

January 13th 2016
By: Melanie

Have you ever heard or participated in the Poetry at Work Day which takes place each year on the 14th of January? The scheme that encourages creative reading and writing in the work place is now in it’s fourth year, and is a great way to cheer up a dull January day by writing a poem or two.

If you are wondering what it’s all about it was started by Tweetspeak who believe that bringing creativity into the workplace can make give people a new perspective on work and life in general.

The poetry at work organisation state: ‘here at The Reader Organisation, you may not be surprised to know that poetry is part of every working day, not just for our Project Workers around the UK who share and read poems aloud in our weekly shared reading groups or on our courses where we are turning more people into shared reading practitioners, but in our offices too. Great literature truly is at the heart of all we do, and we make sure that we never lose sight of the power of poetry to bring some clarity, creativity and peace of mind within our busy working days as each team starts every one of their weekly team meetings with a poem. The most recent poem read in the Communications and Development Team meeting was Begin by Brendan Kennelly, appropriate for the still new beginning of the year and with an inspiring message to begin each of our days, working or otherwise.’

Morning pages, or when you write about three pages in long hand – a stream of consciousness writing done first thing in the morning has long been associated with the art of clearing our heads and making us more creative in our lives, a vital factor in making us take our lives and businesses into the future.

If you would like to take part in this year’s Poetry at work day, then you can start by checking out the Featured poem page of their website and perhaps sharing them with your colleagues http://thereaderonline.co.uk/category/featured-poem/ or alternatively if you have a twitter account tweet your favourite verse or use the hashtag #PoetryatWork.

Source: http://thereaderonline.co.uk/2014/01/14/happy-poetry-at-work-day/