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How To Create A Show-Stopping Garden This Autumn…

September 4th 2014
By: Melanie

Autumn is a really good time to think about planting perennials, trees and shrubs in your garden, as they will have a chance to grow new roots before the shock of winter frosts, however more delicate plants should be planted in spring.

Before visiting a garden centre – where no doubt you will be overwhelmed by the variety of plants on offer, try doing some research on-line, about which plants will best suit your garden’s soil, position and your families needs.

There are a multitude of sites that offer the user the ability to create their own garden space with different types of plants from dense leafy shrubs to spiky plants such as http://smallblueprinter.com/garden/planner.html. However this site gives very little advice about the positioning of plants, for this visit: http://www.theenglishgarden.co.uk this is packed full of information about all types of plants, vegetables and how to plant and look after them.

So which are the best plants for your garden?

You will need to find out the position of your garden in relation to the sun – is it North East facing, South Facing and so fourth? What sort of soil does your garden have, is it alkaline or acid? If you don’t know the answer to this you can buy a cheap soil testing kit either from your local garden centre or the internet.

Once you’ve established this you can then start thinking about the right plants for your garden, the main things you will need to consider are:

• What exposure does it need to the sun; semi-exposure, full exposure or does it need to be planted in a shady position.

• How quickly will it grow – if you want something to fill a space quite quickly then this is an important consideration.

• How large will it grow – make sure you have enough space in your flower bed

• What type of maintenance will it require.

Once you have a rough idea of which plants you would like to plant in your garden, then you will also be able to ask questions at your local garden centre.